Dietz Family Law PLLC - Divorce

THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT

Contact Our Edgewood Office
859-757-2978

PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options.

Quality Family Law Representation

“BECAUSE IT MATTERS”

Quality Family Law Representation
“BECAUSE IT MATTERS”

  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Parenting Plans
  4.  » How to negotiate rules for travel with the kids after divorce

How to negotiate rules for travel with the kids after divorce

On Behalf of | Dec 20, 2021 | Parenting Plans |

Your job takes you to some pretty far-flung places, both within and outside of the country. Taking the kids with you was never a problem when you were married. In fact, your spouse used to come along. 

What about now, when you’re getting divorced? Well, things get a little trickier. You need to address the issue during your custody and parenting time negotiations so that there are no misunderstandings. 

How to make the idea of travel with the kids more palatable to your ex 

Ideally, you want your agreement to allow you to take the kids with you, wherever that may be when it’s your parenting time. In exchange, consider offering the following concessions: 

  •     Agree to notify your co-parent of your travel plans at least seven days in advance if you’re going out of state or out of the country
  •     Agree to provide your co-parent with an itinerary of your travel, in-state or out, so that they know where the children will be located at all times
  •     Agree to provide your co-parent with phone numbers where the kids can be reached at all times (which may not be a problem if the children have their own phones)
  •     Agree to give your co-parent the contact information of whatever responsible adult you have acting as caregiver while you’re at work, whether that’s a relative, friend or nanny.
  •     Ask your co-parent what else you can do to reassure them that the children are safe and will be cared for properly while they’re gone. 

A carefully developed parenting plan can help you avoid conflicts with your co-parent, but that means discussing potential problems long before they arise, and a cooperative spirit can get you a lot in negotiation.

findlaw-network
Share This