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  4.  » Is ‘birdnesting’ part of a viable option for child custody?

Is ‘birdnesting’ part of a viable option for child custody?

On Behalf of | Mar 16, 2021 | Divorce |

Divorce is challenging for any family. When you and your spouse disagree on child custody, the situation can get stressful.

There are many ways that spouses will share custody of their children. Fairly recently, some parents have pursued nesting as an option for arranging custody of their children.

Here’s what you should know about this child custody alternative.

The pros

Changing houses can be difficult for children, especially if one house is a long way away from the other. Kids can have a challenging time making new friends in one neighborhood while having a hard time keeping friends in the old one. Additionally, there can be the question of which school the children will attend once you and your spouse finalize the child custody agreement.

Birdnesting resolves these issues by allowing the children to remain in the family home. At the same time, the parents switch when it time for one or the other to have custody. The idea is that parents have more emotional stability and can more-easily maintain their obligations with a minimal upset for the children. Also, the children get to stay in the home with which they are familiar.

The challenges

The biggest challenge with birdnesting is housing for the parents. Each parent maintaining a separate home and contributing to the shared home can add a significant amount of pressure, both from a financial and a home-maintenance perspective.

Rather than maintaining three homes, some parents choose to share one non-child home and alternate when they do not have custody.

Similar to how some children feel with changing houses, it can be difficult for parents to feel like they are perpetually moving from one residence to another.

Typically, birdnesting works well in temporary situations while parents and children get accustomed to life after divorce. Keep in mind, if you implement a solution as a temporary measure, you may need to revise your custody agreement when you want to make changes.

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